North–South Shrine Game

North–South Shrine Game (defunct)
Mahi Shrine's North–South
College All-Star Football Game
Program cover from 1967 game
StadiumOrange Bowl (1948–1973)
Silverdome (1976)
LocationMiami, Florida (1948–1973)
Pontiac, Michigan (1976)
Operated1948–1973, 1976
Sponsors
Shriners

The North–South Shrine Game was an annual postseason college football all-star game played each December from 1948 to 1973 in Miami, and a final time in 1976 in Pontiac, Michigan.[1] The game was sponsored by the fraternal group Shriners International, with proceeds used to support the Shriners Hospitals for Crippled Children. The full name of the game when played in Miami, as listed on programs, was the Mahi Shrine's North–South College All-Star Football Game.

History

In the early 1930s, there were several college all-star charity games organized between North and South teams. These were held in various locations, and benefitted different charitable causes. While listed in NCAA records,[1] these games were unrelated to the series started in Florida after World War II.

The first two playings of the Miami-based Shrine game, in 1946 and 1947, were contested between high school football teams. Lynn Classical High School from Massachusetts, led by future Boston Red Sox player Harry Agganis, won the first game, while Miami High School won the second game. In October 1948, game organizers announced their intent to invite college football players, noting "there will be enough players for both of us", in reference to the Blue–Gray Football Classic being played in Montgomery, Alabama.[2] Andy Gustafson of Miami and Herman Hickman of Yale, who would both be inducted to the College Football Hall of Fame, were signed to five-year contracts to coach the South and North teams, respectively.[3]

After switching to a college all-star format, the game drew many top players and coaches during its history, such as George Blanda as South quarterback in 1948, and Ara Parseghian as North head coach in 1958. The 1964 game featured two Heisman Trophy winners; John Huarte, that year's recipient, and Roger Staubach, who had won the award in 1963 as a junior.[4] Organizers sought to make the games competitive, including a special rule that allowed a team to receive a kickoff after scoring, if they were still trailing.[5]

The 1956 game created some controversy, when singer Harry Belafonte was invited, and then apparently uninvited, to perform the national anthem before the game.[6] Belafonte felt the incident was racially motivated, which game organizers denied;[7] Belafonte was ultimately allowed to sing, although without accompaniment.[8] At the time, the game was still segregated, as African-American players were not included on the South team until Willie Richardson and Bob Paremore in 1962.[9] In the 1962 game, Richardson was selected as South team MVP, and Paremore received the game's sportsmanship award.[10]

The Shrine executive committee voted to discontinue the Miami-based games after 1973, due to sparse attendance and the failure to secure a national television contract.[11] Organizers in Michigan cited scheduling difficulties and a desire "to solicit a TV package", in not continuing the game beyond 1976.[12]

A similar game, the East–West Shrine Game, has been played since 1925.

Game results

Early years: college all-star teams

Date Winner Score Attendance Stadium City Organizer Ref.
January 1, 1930 North 21–12 20,000 Grant Field Atlanta Yaarab Temple (Shriners) [13][14]
December 28, 1930 South 7–0 2,000 Ebbets Field New York City Knights of Columbus [15][16]
December 10, 1932 South 7–6 500 Baltimore Stadium Baltimore Mayor Howard W. Jackson [17][18]
December 24, 1933 North 3–0 5,000 Brooklyn Sports Stadium[19] New York City American Legion [20][21]
January 1, 1934 North 7–0 12,000 Shields–Watkins Field Knoxville, Tennessee Shriners [22][23]

Notes:

The January 1930 game was a Southern Conference all-star game.[1]
The January 1934 game was a Southeastern Conference all-star game.[1]

Shrine games: high school teams

No. Date North team South team Attendance Ref.
1 December 25, 1946 Lynn Classical High School (MA) 21 Granby High School (VA) 14 18,138 [24]
2 December 25, 1947 McKeesport High School (PA) 14 Miami High School (FL) 34 26,430 [25]

Shrine games: college all-star teams

No. Date Winner Score Attendance
3 December 25, 1948 South 24–14 33,056
4 December 26, 1949 North 20–14 37,378
5 December 25, 1950 South 14–9 39,132
6 December 25, 1951 South 35–7 39,995
7 December 25, 1952 Tie 21–21 42,866
8 December 25, 1953 South 20–0 44,715
9 December 25, 1954 South 20–17 37,847
10 December 26, 1955 South 20–7 42,179
11 December 26, 1956 North 17–7 39,181
12 December 25, 1957 North 23–20 28,303
13 December 27, 1958 South 49–20 35,519
14 December 26, 1959 North 27–17 35,185
15 December 26, 1960 North 41–14 26,146
No. Date Winner Score Attendance
16 December 25, 1961 South 35–16 18,892
17 December 22, 1962 South 15–14 16,952
18 December 21, 1963 South 23–14 19,120
19 December 25, 1964 North 37–30 29,124
20 December 25, 1965 South 21–14 25,640
21 December 26, 1966 North 27–14 28,569
22 December 25, 1967 North 24–0 17,400
23 December 25, 1968 North 3–0 18,063
24 December 25, 1969 North 31–10 23,527
25 December 25, 1970 North 28–7 15,402
26 December 27, 1971 South 7–6 18,640
27 December 25, 1972 North 17–10 18,013
28 December 25, 1973 South 27–6 10,672
29 December 17, 1976 South 24–0 41,627

Notes:

Overall record for Shrine games: South (14–12–1) in college games; South (15–13–1) including high school games.
All Shrine games played at the Miami Orange Bowl, except for the 1976 game, which was played at the Pontiac Silverdome.[1]
The date of the 1949 game is incorrectly listed as December 25 in NCAA records;[1] the game was played on Monday, December 26.[26]

MVPs

Inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame
Year played North South Ref.
Player Pos. College Player Pos. College
1948 no selection
1949 Ralph Pasquariello FB Villanova no selection [27]
1950 Gil Stephenson FB Army John Ford QB Hardin–Simmons [28]
1951 John Turco HB Holy Cross Bill Wade QB Vanderbilt [29]
1952 Donn Moomaw LB UCLA Jack Scarbath QB Maryland [30]
1953 Ken Miller FB Illinois Crawford Mims G Ole Miss [31]
1954 Alan Ameche FB Wisconsin Dick Bielski FB Maryland [32]
1955 Don Holleder E Army George Welsh† QB Navy [33]
1956 Tommy McDonald† HB Oklahoma Billy Ray Barnes FB Wake Forest [34]
1957 Jim Ninowski QB Michigan State Dick Christy HB NC State [35]
1958 Pete Dawkins HB Army Buddy Humphrey QB Baylor [36]
1959 Joe Caldwell QB Army Dan Edgington E Florida [37]
1960 Bill Brown HB Illinois Bobby Skelton QB Alabama [38]
1961 Larry Onesti C Northwestern Bobby Ply QB Baylor [39]
1962 Jerry Gross QB Detroit Mercy Willie Richardson WR Jackson State [40]
1963 Jack Concannon QB Boston College George Mira QB Miami (FL) [41]
1964 John Huarte QB Notre Dame Bob Hayes SE Florida A&M [42]
1965 Nick Rassas S/PR Notre Dame Ed Weisacosky LB Miami (FL) [43]
1966 Pete Duranko DT Notre Dame Gene Trosch DT Miami (FL) [44]
1967 Dennis Coyne LB Northwestern Gordon Lambert DE Tennessee-Martin [45]
1968 Bob Gladieux RB Notre Dame Bill Bergey LB Arkansas State [46]
1969 Bruce Van Ness RB Rutgers Clovis Swinney G Arkansas State [47]
1970 Lynn Dickey QB Kansas State Dave Elmendorf S Texas A&M [48]
1971 Keith Schroeder LB Iowa State Joe Federspiel LB Kentucky [49]
1972 Rufus Ferguson RB Wisconsin Chuck Foreman RB Miami (FL) [50]
1973 Gerald Tinker WR Kent State Jimmy Allen CB UCLA [51]
1976 Tom Hannon S Michigan State Steve Pisarkiewicz QB Missouri [52]

Most MVP selections (college): 4, accomplished by Army, Notre Dame, and Miami (FL).

Sportsmanship award

(awarded intermittently)

Year played Player Pos. College Team Ref.
1950 Herb Hannahnote OT Alabama South [28]
1951 Bill Wade QB Vanderbilt South [29]
1955 Jack Losch HB Miami (FL) South [33]
1958 Billy Stacy HB Mississippi State South [36]
1961 Larry Wilson SE Miami (FL) South [39]
1962 Bob Paremore HB Florida A&M South [40]
Herb Hannah was the father of John Hannah.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f "BOWL/ALL STAR GAME RECORDS" (PDF). NCAA. 2016. Retrieved June 2, 2017.
  2. ^ "North–South Game Planned In Miami". Fort Lauderdale News. Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Associated Press. October 22, 1948. Retrieved June 6, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Hickman, Gustafson To Coach Rival Elevens". The Palm Beach Post. West Palm Beach, Florida. Associated Press. October 31, 1948. Retrieved June 6, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Staubach, Hardin Coming Southward". Fort Lauderdale News. Fort Lauderdale, Florida. December 1, 1964. Retrieved June 5, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  5. ^ Frank, Ben (December 26, 1964). "North Tops South on Huarte Pass". Decatur Daily Review. Decatur, Illinois. Associated Press. Retrieved June 3, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Belafonte to Aid Fight on Bias". Detroit Free-Press. UPI. May 23, 1962. Retrieved June 3, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Belafonte To Lead Singing at Miami". The Courier-Journal. Louisville, Kentucky. Associated Press. December 26, 1956. Retrieved June 3, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  8. ^ Cadou Jr., Jep (December 26, 1956). "Jep Cadou Jr. Calls 'Em". The Indianapolis Star. Retrieved June 3, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  9. ^ Fraley, Oscar (December 20, 1962). "Negro Players On South Squad For First Time". The Brownsville Herald. Brownsville, Texas. UPI. Retrieved June 3, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  10. ^ Fraley, Oscar (December 24, 1962). "Sports Parade". Tyrone Daily Herald. Tyrone, Pennsylvania. UPI. Retrieved June 4, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "North–South Game Canceled". Lakeland Ledger. Lakeland, Florida. Associated Press. August 16, 1974.
  12. ^ "North–South Shrine Game cancelled". Daily Herald. Arlington Heights, Illinois. November 26, 1977. Retrieved June 3, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Dixie Gridiron Stars Clash In Atlanta Today". The Anniston Star. Anniston, Alabama. UP. January 1, 1930. Retrieved June 7, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  14. ^ Graham, Dillon L. (January 2, 1930). "Gridmen From Lower Half Of Conference Outplayed In Atlanta Charity Contest". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. Associated Press. Retrieved June 7, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  15. ^ "North, South To Have Game For Charities". Star-Gazette. Elmira, New York. Associated Press. December 18, 1930. Retrieved June 7, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "Charity Contest Financial Fizzle". The Lincoln Star. Lincoln, Nebraska. Associated Press. December 29, 1930. Retrieved June 7, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Ask Sebastian To Charity Fray". The Evening Independent. Massillon, Ohio. November 1, 1932. Retrieved June 7, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
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  19. ^ "Brooklyn Sports Stadium". covehurst.net. Retrieved June 7, 2017. Stillwell Avenue, Bay 50th Street, Avenue Y
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  22. ^ "State Players Sign For All-Star Clash". The Clarion-Ledger. Jackson, Mississippi. Associated Press. December 3, 1933. Retrieved June 7, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  23. ^ Hutchens, Roy E. (January 2, 1934). "North Trims South At Knoxville". Asheville Citizen-Times. Asheville, North Carolina. Associated Press. Retrieved June 7, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  24. ^ "Lynn High Grid Team Wins North–South Game". The News Journal. Wilmington, Delaware. Associated Press. December 26, 1946. Retrieved June 6, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "Miami Grid Team Tops McKeesport In Orange Bowl". The Gazette and Daily. York, Pennsylvania. Associated Press. December 26, 1947. p. 28. Retrieved June 6, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  26. ^ "Football (advertisement)". Fort Lauderdale News. Fort Lauderdale, Florida. December 12, 1949. Retrieved June 6, 2017.
  27. ^ "Shriners At Orange Bowl Get Awards". Escanaba Daily Press. Escanaba, Michigan. Associated Press. December 28, 1949. Retrieved June 6, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  28. ^ a b "John Ford Voted Most Valuable In Shrine Game". The Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. December 26, 1950. Retrieved June 6, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  29. ^ a b Evans, Luther (December 26, 1951). "Wade Praised By All". The Tennessean. Nashville, Tennessee. Retrieved June 6, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "North, South Stars Duel To 21-21 Tie". Fort Lauderdale News. Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Associated Press. December 26, 1952. Retrieved June 6, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
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  32. ^ "Garrigus' TD Sparks South Rally For 20-17 Win". Fort Lauderdale News. Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Associated Press. December 26, 1954. Retrieved June 6, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  33. ^ a b "Welsh Is Voted Most Valuable". Orlando Evening Star. Orlando, Florida. INS. December 27, 1955. Retrieved June 5, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  34. ^ Funk, Ben (December 27, 1956). "'Rebs' Help North To 17-7 Triumph". Tallahassee Democrat. Tallahassee, Florida. Associated Press. Retrieved June 5, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "Christy Sparkles In North Victory". Cumberland Evening Times. Cumberland, Maryland. INS. December 26, 1957. Retrieved June 5, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  36. ^ a b "South's Aerials Tumble Yankees". Pensacola News Journal. Pensacola, Florida. Associated Press. December 28, 1958. Retrieved June 4, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
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  38. ^ Eidge, Frank (December 27, 1960). "Brown Fires Yankees From Behind, 41-12". The Anniston Star. Anniston, Alabama. UPI. Retrieved June 4, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
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  40. ^ a b Richman, Milton (December 24, 1962). "Another Willie Comes Into The Sports Scene". The Brownsville Herald. Brownsville, Texas. UPI. Retrieved June 4, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
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  42. ^ "Huarte-Snow Click For North Victory". The Salina Journal. Salina, Kansas. Associated Press. December 27, 1964. Retrieved June 3, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  43. ^ Bondurant, Bill (December 26, 1965). "Crowd Chants, McCune Comes Through". Fort Lauderdale News. Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Retrieved June 3, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
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  49. ^ "South Wins Shrine Game". Oshkosh Northwestern. Oshkosh, Wisconsin. UPI. December 28, 1971. Retrieved June 3, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
  50. ^ "Shrine Game Battle of Bobbles". Progress-Bulletin. Pomona, California. UPI. December 26, 1972. Retrieved June 3, 2017 – via newspapers.com.
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